Selfies: Paintings by Kathryn McGinley

Opening reception: April 7 from 5–7PM

On display in the Leo Reynolds Gallery

 

 

 

From the artist

I am a Florida based artist currently working on a collection of portrait paintings in acrylic ink on paper.

This collection of selfies acts as a social commentary on how we represent ourselves on the internet, our need to feel relevant, and on the vulnerability of portraying our individual lifestyles on the World Wide Web.

I implemented the single line drawing technique as one of the main elements to add another layer of abstract quality to the paintings. I love working in ink for its fluidity, vibrant colors, and building translucent layers of brush marks and blotching. This body of work has a fun and inviting energy and is one of my favorites to work with.

I received a B.A. in Art from the University of North Florida and have exhibited art throughout Florida. In addition to showing and selling, I’ve taught small art classes, had an internship as a volunteer artist with Art with a Heart in Healthcare at Wolfson Children’s Hospital, and currently volunteer at the Foosaner Art Museum and the Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts.


A Tale of Six Counties

(above) “Me and Kathryn-Anne” (Cuyahoga County) – Pamela A. Canzater

 

In celebration of Black History Month, the works of Pamela A. Canzater are on display in the Leo Reynolds gallery.

 

(above) “In the Midnight” (Portage County) – Pamela A. Canzater        

                                 

(below) “Walking with My Savior” (Portage County) – Pamela A. Canzater

 

Her exhibit, “A Tale of Six Counties; How One Black Family Nurtured Their Southern/Northern Daughter,” is a biographical walk through her life of being an African-American woman raised in six different counties from Alabama to New York.

 

(above) “Am I Black Enough?” (Queens County) – Pamela A. Canzater                                                

(below) “Bedtime Stories” (Perry County) – Pamela A. Canzater

 

An closing reception for the three current exhibits will be held on March 3, during First Friday Downtown.

 


Relics: New Works by Anita Stewart & Amanda Ann Palmer

s3

On display January 21 through March 3, 2017

Opening reception January 21, 2017, 5-7pm

Closing reception March 3, 2017, 5-7pm

Palmer - Pedistals1

Anita Stewart’s Artist Statement:

My current work continues to reflect my interest in the theory that nothing ever leaves the universe and nothing new enters. I’ve also begun to think about the souls or essence or energy that temporarily inhabits our physical bodies as well as the bodies of other living entities. These tabernacles that once held life are very intriguing, especially as they begin to decay and reveal their depth.

When I began working with the boxes, I often thought of them as reliquaries.  What is a relic, in the traditional religious sense, if not part of a tabernacle? So the words began to become interchangeable, and I now see the boxes as keepers of relics and/or tabernacles – used and disintegrating ones, but tabernacles nonetheless.

Amanda Ann Palmer’s Artist Statement:

I started building this body of work as a way to examine my relationship with curiosity. This is only the beginning of my investigation and my first interest, the forest, seemed an appropriate place to launch.

When I remember being small, in the forest, the first thing that comes to mind is the feeling of pine sap on my fingers. I know it’s sticky and is going to take three days to wash it off, but I can’t help myself. I always pick up pine cones, needing to feel the prickle of the scales and admire the spiral that embellishes the bottom. The sense of touch is prominent in all my early forest memories. I can feel my feet dragging through the sea of pine straw in the thicket I used to play in with my brothers. We would make a collection of all the relics we found and put them on a shelf in our fort. The forest, my encyclopedia of texture, has held my attention since.

While working on this series, it became apparent that I was constructing an homage to a child’s curiosity.I am excited to explore curiosity in a broader way. I hope embracing it will allow me to move through this world with more empathy and generosity.

I would like to dedicate this series to Clementine, Max, Judson, Abe, Cora and Jim.


Call for entries Focus 2017

2017 FOCUS Photography Exhibition Calendar
March 1: Digital Images, entry form, and entry fee due
March 17: Artist Notifications will be emailed
April 1: All work must be delivered to the museum by 5pm
April 14: through May 29: Exhibition dates
May 5, First Friday: Opening reception
June 9: All work must be picked up or shipped out from the museum.

Official Rules:

ELIGIBILITY
Focus is open to all artists working in traditional or digital photography. Each artist may submit up to three works for consideration. Youth ages 14 and younger will be placed in a separate category.

LIMITATIONS
Entries must not exceed 60” inches in any dimension and no entry may be smaller than 8”x 10.” Entries must be framed — sturdy, wired and ready for hanging. NO saw-tooth hangers, staples, or tape allowed. No frames with easel backing will be eligible for consideration. The Gadsden Museum of Art reserves the right to exclude any work not meeting presentation standards.

COST
Entry fee is $10 per submission; three submission limit per person. Payments may be cash, check or money order payable to the Gadsden Museum of Art. No Refunds. All money collected will be used as prize money.

SUBMISSION OF WORK
Images of work must be submitted digitally to gmagadsden@gmail.com. A blind jury will be judging your image so keep in mind all images must be high quality. Files must be JPG format 72dpi no more than 750 pixels on the longest side, and labeled ex Smith_John.jpg. Photographs will not be considered until all items are received: Digital images, entry form, and payment. Only winners will be required to fill out a W-9. W-9’s are available at irs.gov or can be picked up at the Gadsden Museum of Art. (If a photographer does not want to fill out a W-9 they will not be eligible for any prize money but will still be allowed to enter show.)

JURY PROCESS
Once all digital images are submitted, a blind jury will review entries and select images for display. All artists will be notified via email regarding the acceptance of their work.

CASH PRIZES
Cash prizes will be given to Best in Show, 1st place, 2nd place, 3rd place, and Honorable Mention award winners.

DELIVERY
Artists are responsible for shipping and dropping off work. The Gadsden Museum of Art will not be responsible for any damage incurred in transit. All work must be shipped or hand-delivered no later than April 1, 2017. Late submissions will not be accepted. Frames must be wrapped for protection upon delivery.

ABOUT THE JUDGE
(To be announced.)

Entry Form: Focus 2017 Entry Form Updated

 

 


Grounded by Jennifer Allen

14642572_10205441111586877_1734346826_n

Opening Reception First Friday November 4, 5-7 p.m.

As an artist, I have always found myself in search of home. I longed for somewhere to plant a garden and grow with a family. Along the way I discovered where I wanted my home to be. This summer was spent learning how to build a house with my fiancé. With each new task, struggles and victories followed. While it wasn’t glamorous, it was our opportunity to grow and build a life together. Today, I am grounded. I have found my home. I wanted to plant the garden that would grow from the seeds of our labor. This installation was made from materials that were left over from our home. I manipulated ordinary construction materials into a textural garden that has created an other worldly feel. Welcome to Grounded.

On display in the Leo Reynolds Gallery through mid-January 2017.


Cadence by Sarah Dunn

Opening reception Friday, July 1 from 6 to 8 p.m.

On display in the Leo Reynolds Gallery through August 26, 2016.

cadence_web

Sarah Dunn’s artist statement:

The exhibit, “Cadence,” is an attempt to gain an understanding of our daily lives and how we express aspects of our everyday experiences. The work displays an investigation into what communication and consideration sound like and what this closer interaction might feel like when presented in this particular gallery setting. To develop the project, I first interviewed a group of people from differing backgrounds. After the interviewing process, I closely photographed each person from varying perspectives and distances. Both the interview and photographic processes seek to consider the unspoken and sometimes unnoticed aspects of our everyday experiences that we don’t necessarily communicate or acknowledge. The combination of the audio, the photographs, and the way in which the two mediums are meant to interact in constant communication with one another offer a chorus of individual thoughts and physical representations. Walking through the space, the audio will create a collective rhythm from individual voices as it responds to the movement of others. While the exhibit requires that the viewer physically move through the space in order to both hear and see each person represented, it seeks to acknowledge how we depend on, respond to, and interact with each other. Therefore, “Cadence” is the result, not only of the movement of the photographs connecting different elements of the figures, but also of the unique compositions created as each voice responds to the presence of the viewer.